Sentence Structure

Written English is more formal than spoken English. In written English complete sentences are required. If you write as you speak some of your sentences will be ungrammatical.

Check that there is a subject (who or what is the agent of action), an active verb (the action that happens) and an object (what proceeds from the action). See the breakdown of the following example:

Public safety must be the primary concern of any police force.

Subject: Public safety; active verb: must be; object: the primary concern of any police force

1. The SIMPLE sentence: the basic sentence (see example above).

2. The COMPOUND sentence: where two simple sentences are combined with a conjunction (joining word) such as and, but, although, so, thus etc.

 Public safety must be the primary concern of any police force, thus officer training should focus on this purpose above all else.

3. The COMPLEX sentence: where additional phrases and clauses give more meaning to a sentence

In an increasingly complex world with job specialisation, public safety must be the primary concern of any police force, thus officer training,whether at the entry level or for promotion, should focus on this purpose above all else.

Good writers combine short and long, but clear sentences. It is not a sign of scholarship to write in long complicated sentences.

Seek clarity in writing.